Our Race

Our Race

As I look at the picture above I rejoice in the family God has given me. My precious family, the treasure that God has placed in my hands to guide and disciple. Please keep them in your prayers as they grow. Tanya in now 16 and starting to think about college. She has many choices to make in the next year or two. We are hoping to get her started with classes over the internet and at least let her get some basics finished. Christy is 13 and loves life. She has a servants heart and can be counted on to help whether it is with cookies or cleaning. Josh (9) is starting his personal race. He loves action, mechanics, building, and good stories. Pray that we can guide him into meaningful service for the Lord and that we can help all of them grow in the Lord.

(The new background and Title is courtesy of Tanya and her new computer. :) )

Saturday, February 14, 2009

The Life Lived Under the Authority of Truth

As I was thinking of our life today, Valentines Days and our last Saturday in the Mara, I read over a blog that David Blackney writes for our mission (http://mastersmission.blogspot.com/2007/11/if-missions-was-only-witnessing.html) and thought how accurate it is. What a life we live.

Today started for me at five thirty and I was working on the truck by 7 AM. Yesterday, we found two crossed wires that had caused the computer to shut off the truck. With the engine finally running we had lots of jobs that needed to be done from setting the timing to bleeding brakes, clutch, and power steering systems and doing an alignment on the steering system. Of course that is not the only work for the day. I have four guys working at the hospital building on a sign with stones that I had cut in Nov. We also had a dinner date at 1 o'clock with a local family that want to say thanks for all the things we have done and to visit a little. After the dinner I ended up at a meeting of some local elders for an hour as we talked about President Obama and the government of Kenya. The government here is involved in, according to the Elders, at least six major scandals, from selling the harvested corn to India, which leaves Kenya hungry, to land grabs and corruption. As we talked I was able to share about how important righteousness is in any society. Without God we are left with our own personal welfare being our God and this is what happens. Many of them agreed with me. I then took Tanya and some tools and fixed the village well one more time. We were surrounded by 40 kids and adults and spent an hour and a half working and talking with them. (I learned that Tanya in Maasai is the words "I refuse!" LOL) I invited them to church and hope to see many of them in Sunday School or Church tomorrow. On the way home we had another opportunity to stop and talk with some different Elders about the Sekenani water situation. Again we discussed the needs of the community and the importance of righteousness. Again I was able to invite many of them to church. After I post this I will work on the message for tomorrows service. With many new faces hopefully coming, I want to tell them about the Truth of God. "I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life...)

With this as a back drop, I want you to read over the Blog from David Blackney. Our life is so much more than giving hand outs or sitting under a tree teaching. It is the living of a life as an example in front of an unbelieving world. It is the continual pointing to the one who has all the answers and has given us his plan for us to live and to know him. As we point to Him and His truth, people will be drawn or repelled. We are privileged to be serving Him and to know the Truth that truly sets us free.


"If missions was only witnessing or only doing benevolences, we wouldn't need The Master's Mission.

But if missions is establishing and strengthening churches that can accurately and persuasively present Christ, churches that can also reproduce themselves, churches that can train their members to love their neighbors, then preparation like that offered by TMM becomes essential for those embarking on such a mission.

Whether it is doctrinal fidelity or technical ability in building construction, the best preparation is not always accomplished in a strict academic setting. Most of us learn more efficiently through observation and imitation. In changing a tire or sharing the message of salvation, reading a 'how to' manual and actually doing it are two different things. Thus Paul told Timothy, "the things you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, practice these things" (Phil. 4:9). This ongoing practice, especially when supervised by an experienced coach who by his words and modeling can help you improve, is what moves us towards excellence. These kind of teachers, practitioners themselves, represent instructors who are the opposite of those derided by the adage: 'those who can't, teach.' Paul exhorted the Thessalonians to 'excel still more' by continuing to advance in the ideal they had caught from him and the apostolic team in behaving in ways that please God (Thes. 4:1, Berkeley Version of NT).

The church must excel in both the proclamation of the Great Commission and the practice of the Great Commandment. To do so, they must have these kinds of instructors. Truth is more often caught than formally taught. We would never neglect formal teaching times, but recognize that today's leaders have neglected the informal disciplining opportunities of sharing life experiences and what should be mature responses to those events with those who are young in the faith or who are being apprenticed for leadership in the church. The Scripture emphasizes both kinds of learning. We have neglected the second. The challenge in missions is not only to find the "Timothy's" who can entrust to faithful men what they have learned from their "Paul's", but it is first in finding the adequate "Paul's" to begin the process. Hence the comprehensive requirements given for qualified church leaders. The help needed determines the skills the helper must have.

Where do churches (in America or on the mission field) need help?

In the same areas where everyone needs help: Marriage, child rearing, finances, dealing with sin and temptation, business ethics, knowing and doing God's will in their setting.

Where do churches (in America or on the mission field) need help?

Finding leaders who can address these issues from the perspective of God's Word, instructors who refuse to cloud or compromise the truth with their opinions. Churches need proper instruction and models to follow in maintaining the purity of truth and devotion to Christ, in rightly responding to the endless needs of their neighbors, and for zeal in application and performance in all these areas of life that please God."


Thank you all who support and allow us the privilege of working full time for the Master, modeling his way and life. We are blessed to know Him and to be able to share about him. Pray that more Maasai will find Christ and the answers to their lives.

Thursday, February 5, 2009

Rain in the Mara

I don't have much time as the internet goes down every time it rains, and the clouds are here and the rain is coming. Here are a couple of pictures to look at. The first set is a before and after picture. The mornings are foggy which is very unusual. The school is only 400 to 500 yards away.

This is a rainbow over Shayne's new house. The evening are pretty as the storms come. We also have enjoyed the water. The ground is green again. I talked to one of the Maasai yesterday and he told me "This is the month to sleep now. There is plenty of grass." Before the rains they were hiking 2 - 3 hours to find grass. Now they let the cows outside the boma and go back to sleep. :)